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RJI in the News

The 7 Deadly Sins of Modern Publishing

Source DigiDay on May 7, 2014 0 Comments

Online publishers constantly talk about how they’re making their sites as beautiful and reader-friendly as possible, with layouts that put the reader first, innovative storytelling formats and ads that don’t detract from the user experience. So why do so many publishers still insult their readers with intrusive ads, offers and borrowed content?

We rounded up some of the classic examples of the worst offenses.

San Francisco Chronicle Photographer Lacy Atkins Is Finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize

Source Boston News on May 7, 2014 0 Comments

SAN FRANCISCO, CA -- (Marketwired) -- 04/14/14 -- The San Francisco Chronicle announced today that photographer Lacy Atkins is a finalist for the 2014 Pulitzer Prize for Featured Photography for her work on "Even Odds," a story about the fear, struggles and loss that African American males face in Oakland and the city's attempt to address them.

Atkins worked tirelessly to understand the subjects and their personal struggles, even during a difficult time when her own partner was battling cancer. Her dedication to her work and subjects is evident in the profound nature of her photography.

Student-designed Android app gathers donations for public radio’s producers

Source Current.org on May 7, 2014 0 Comments

An app conceived designed by an interdisciplinary team of students won an annual competition for student developers held by the university’s Reynolds Journalism Institute and sponsored by the Public Media Platform.

Newspaper publishers remain optimistic about future of their industry

Source iNews Design on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

Despite sharp revenue declines over the last five years, publishers of U.S. daily newspapers remain optimistic about the future of their industry.

After a year marked by solid growth in mobile products and a proliferation of paid content models, an overwhelming majority of publishers in a recent survey — 69 percent — expressed optimism about the future of their business. Only 6 percent said they were not optimistic. More than 400 publishers were surveyed in late 2013 as part of the second Publishers Confidence Index, the largest study of its kind, conducted by the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute and the Missouri School of Journalism.

David Cohn: Circa's mobile approach: The structure and form of news re-thought

Source Slide Share on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

1. Follow the news NovemberConfidential
2. How we consume news c. 1605-2008 c. Today e.g. gap time while in line for coffee, waiting at a subway stop, etc.
3. Current news apps take an existing format and force it into a smaller screen where readers also have a dramatically shorter attention span New York Times iPhone App

Introducing Real-Time Social Journalism at RJI’s MobileFirst Symposium

Source Bubble And Blender on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

On a cold Sunday evening in February, John Walton (@thatjohn) took a break from binge watching House of Cards Season 2, and logged on to an aviation forum to catch up with colleagues a half a world away. A freelance aviation journalist, Walton and his friends were watching air traffic when it became clear that an Ethiopian Airlines 737 had flown dramatically off course. As they listened in to air traffic control, the reason for the misdirection became clear: the aircraft’s pilot had hi-jacked the plane and was seeking amnesty in Geneva, Switzerland.

This journalist knew he had a story and he knew he had it hours before any other reporter was likely to. He didn’t, however, have a printing press or a broadcast tower or even a well-trafficked web site, for that matter. He did have Twitter and more than 3,000 followers. So, at 8:25p.m. EST on February 16, John used the only publishing platform at his disposal to break the news.

Recognizing the value of news you get

Source Whidbey News-Times on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

In 2011, only 41 percent of newspapers in the United States were using some form of meter or paywall. According to the Reynolds Journalism Institute, that number has climbed to 70 percent.

Digital paywalls are the newspaper model now

Source JackLail.com on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

2013 was the year when paywalls became the norm for newspapers. 70 percent of newspapers now have some sort of paywall, according to a survey by the Reynolds Journalism Institute. That's up from 41 percent in 2011 and 47 percent in 2012.

RJI Study: Newspapers growing revenue in non-traditional ways

Source iNews Design on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

Although the overall amounts are small, a handful of alternative revenue streams pursued by daily newspapers are throwing off double-digit profits.

And while monetizing digital operations remains a challenge, daily newspaper publishers expect digital revenue to represent a significantly greater share of their revenue stream in the coming three years.

Interviews with 416 publishers in a recent telephone survey revealed strong expectations that their papers’ reliance on print revenue would decline in the coming three years and that digital and alternative sources would represent a growing share of overall revenue.

Editor's Weekly: St. Louis history is a hit with current residents

Source St. Louis Public Radio on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

In contrast to historical reporting that looks back with clarity, I spent Monday at a conference that looked forward with some uncertainty. The gathering, called Mobile First, was organized by the Reynolds Journalism Institute at the Mizzou Journalism School.

Be informed!

Source Emissourian.com on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

Do you know who is running for office in the April elections? Do you know what other issues are on the ballot? Do you care? Of course you should and the odds are you probably do. That’s according to the results of a recent survey conducted by the Insight and Survey Center at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute.

Smartphones changing face of journalism

Source WAMC: Northeast Public Radio on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

A survey by the Reynolds Journalism Institute finds that the smartphone has become an important platform for accessing the news. Sixty-three percent of smartphone users report that they used their smartphone to access news semi-regularly during a 2012 survey.

Why Warren Buffett owns this community newspaper publisher and why you should too

Source The Motley Fool on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

The Reynolds Journalism Institute found in a 2013 survey that in small U.S. towns and cities where the circulation size of the local newspaper was 15,000 or less, 96 percent and 75 percent of readers respectively paid for their newspaper and read all or most of the publication.

Recognizing the value of news you get | Publisher's Column

Source Whidbey News-Times on April 14, 2014 0 Comments

For nearly 125 years, the Whidbey News-Times has been providing loyal readers with coverage they can count on.

The industry has been transformed countless times during that century, going from hot-lead presses to giant floppy disks to all-desktop. Now into our second century, newspapers are finding a place on the Internet.

Our most avid website readers will notice something new starting today. All website readers will be prompted to either register their print subscription account for full online access at no additional charge, and others will be invited to subscribe.

58% of News Organizations Are in for a Big Surprise

Source Bubble And Blender on April 7, 2014 0 Comments

The funny thing about data, big or small, is that with the right lens, you can see just about anything you want.

In an article headlined “Newspaper publishers remain optimistic about future of their industry,” my beloved and esteemed Reynolds Journalism Institute announced the results the second annual Publishers Confidence Index, a study of more than 400 publishers conducted by Michael M. Jenner for RJI and the Missouri School of Journalism. Despite undisputed evidence that the newspaper industry has been profoundly and unreversibly disrupted by technology, changing demographics, and modern business models, “an overwhelming majority of publishers in a recent survey — 69 percent — expressed optimism about the future of their business,” the article reported.

SheByShe Survey Finds Women Have Love/hate Relationships With Smartphones

Source Digital Journal on April 7, 2014 0 Comments

Burlingame, CA - (PRWEB) March 25, 2014

SheByShe™, a new women's opinion site dedicated to giving women a voice, today announced the strong, conflicting results of its "Smartphones: What Women Think" survey. Although smartphones have rapidly evolved into a necessity, with 54 percent of those surveyed saying they "can't live without" their smartphones; the respondents also expressed grave concerns about the impact pervasive smartphone use is having on society, families and children. Of the women responding to the survey, mostly Internet-savvy, millennial working women, 71 percent said they were deeply bothered when seeing so many people engrossed in smartphones in public, and only 25 percent think smartphones are having a positive impact overall on society. Thirty-six percent feel smartphones are having a negative impact on society, and 39 percent believe the impact is neutral.

"These survey results reveal an interesting paradox; women seem to be saying they love their smartphones when they work for them, and they hate their smartphones when they don't, and yes, sometimes it's both things at once," said Chris Shipley, leading technology industry analyst, entrepreneur and currently a Reynolds Fellow at the Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute at the University of Missouri School of Journalism.

Updating the Missouri Method with Rapid Iteration, Multiplatform Delivery

Source TMCnet.com on April 7, 2014 0 Comments

COLUMBIA, Mo., March 21 -- The University of Missouri's School of Journalism issued the following news release: What causes species to migrate? Inhospitable conditions? A yearning for home? A longing for greener pastures? In the case of multiplatform migration in news, it's quite possibly a combination of all three. The conditions that once supported robust life are rapidly degenerating for television and radio affiliates and newspapers alike. Those conditions are urging journalists to reinvent themselves within a better ecosystem.

BBG’s Will Sullivan Speaks at SXSW Interactive

Source Broadcasting Board of Governors on March 19, 2014 0 Comments

BBG’s Director of Mobile, Will Sullivan, spoke at South By Southwest Interactive last week in a session entitled, “43 Tongues” about the launching the Voice of America mobile apps in 43 languages.

Sullivan’s session was part of SXSWi’s “Future 15″ emerging and new technology track, focused on quick dives in new technologies and skills for emerging markets. The presentation discussed how to localize content and user experiences for global audiences. The audience was made up of leaders from international media outlets like Deutsche Welle and Radio Netherlands, and global marketing firms such as Weber Shandwick. Sullivan’s presentation peaked quite a bit of interest in person and on Twitter. Afterwards several members of the audience had follow-up questions to learn more about building international news and information products.

Updating the Missouri Method with Rapid Iteration, Multi-Platform Delivery

Source MediaShift on March 18, 2014 0 Comments

This is the second installment of Jim Flink’s coverage of his new multi-platform experiment at the University of Missouri. Check out his opening piece that ran in February on EducationShift.

What causes species to migrate? Inhospitable conditions? A yearning for home? A longing for greener pastures?

In the case of multi-platform migration in news, it’s quite possibly a combination of all three. The conditions that once supported robust life are rapidly degenerating for television and radio affiliates and newspapers alike. Those conditions are urging journalists to reinvent themselves within a better ecosystem.

Creating innovative mobile products for emerging markets

Source SNPA on March 17, 2014 0 Comments

The Donald W. Reynolds Journalism Institute's Mobile First symposium on March 31-April 1 has reached full capacity and registrations are no longer being accepted. But the event will be streamed live during both days. Sign up to watch the live stream. If you have questions about attendance, please click here.
Speaker spotlight: Will Sullivan

Of the 7 billion people on Earth, 5 billion people don't have access to the Internet, says Will Sullivan, director of mobile at the Broadcasting Board of Governors and a guest speaker at this month's Mobile First symposium.